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20121227
20121227
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate economies by means o
; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death
of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecological
with the resources at hand. -- >> the c.s. becoming like greece? >> no, that is a profoundly -- do you see as becoming like greece? >> that is a profoundly different situation. the congressional budget office says that if we stay on the course we are on, we will have a debt that is 230% of our gross domestic product of the the next 20 years. most experts say once you get a debt of more than 9% of gross domestic product, that inhibit future economic growth in a significant way. this is just about -- not just about numbers on page, it is really about opportunities for people. whether you will be able to send your kid to school, to college, whether it will be able to buy a car, my house, whether we will have economic opportunity for the people of the country. the best academic research that has been done shows that if a country's debt gets too large in relationship to the size of its economy, the economy does not grow as fast. opportunity is lost. jobs are lost. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talk
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
of the year of crisis with a steady hand. she has stuck to her goals in 2012 -- to save the euro and greece without compromising germany's financial stability. >> how alive is the concept of charity? we bring you an example from mexico. >> first, some of the stories making news. japan has a new prime minister, voted in by the lower house of parliament earlier today. his liberal democratic party won by a landslide in polls earlier this month. he has vowed to introduce aggressive monetary policies and says he wants to revise japan's pacifist constitution. >> china has launched the world's longest high-speed rail route. the line between cities is almost 2,900 kilometers long. trains travel an average speed of 300 kilometers per hour, cutting travel time in half to just eight hours. >> floods in malaysia have forced more than 13,000 people to flee their homes. the floods have hit several states of the country's east coast. one woman died after slipping into a swollen river, and forecasters are expecting more rain to fall. >> china's leading producer of rare earth is attempting to shut down some
of greece. greece is getting bailed out. and going on back and forth. will there be a deal by december 31st? i don't think so, but if a deal gets penned out by mid-january, we can look forward to focusing on earnings and get this fiscal cliff over with so we can see what's going on important in the world, and that's earnings. >> let me -- can i comment on that? >> yeah, sure. >> i want to comment on rick santelli's optimistic view that maybe there really is a deal in the offing. he has a point, you know. it's not over, you know, until it's over and these guys do sometimes come up with last-minute deals, but i want to be very clear. in order for that to happen john boehner basically has to agree that he's going to get a deal out of house with majority democrat votes, and i don't see why he does that before january 3rd. >> you're assuming the president has all the leverage, and i think the president would have a horrible legacy starting out with such turmoil, so i disagree. i think there's movement on the white house side on entitlements. >> rick, you do have to accept the fact that john boeh
't going pay its debts. we are going to be like greece. that was -- everybody -- both sides, by the way, republicans and democrats, both used the phrase default. you know perfectly well how it works in the government. you can make choices. >> i hate to break the news to you but -- i don't think anyone other than watching cnbc anyone actually cares and nobody believes the federal government will not pay social security or other debts. >> are you kidding me? i think they do. that's what they start with. right? start with the social security checks aren't going to go out. then -- what do people do, call their congressmen? the elderly get frightened. they think they won't have their weekly paychecks. >> this would not be the first time anyone from the executive branch tried to scare senior sit sense what do we do? we are going over the cliff. do you think we are going over cliff? >> i talked to the speaker's people today. bottom line is the speaker did remarkably smart. he didn't bring his bill up because he didn't have the votes and then sent every one of his members home so they could not
, the worse is finally past, there's some hideous headline out of greece that the comes back with a vengeance and the s&p gets bashed down by a torrent of selling. that's why it's so important to prepare yourself and your stocks for the next catastrophe around the corner. expected or unexpected so that you can make money in any market, or at least lose less and not just when things are going smoothly. you have to build this stuff into what i call your world view. you have to assume that somewhere sometime something will go wrong. i'm not saying you should be a super skeptic permabear, not at all. over the course of my 31-plus years in this business i've seen the averages climb way too way, watch the market make people way too much money to ever be too cynical and close-minded. being negative all the type has not historically been a lucrative strategy, and i don't see any reason why that should change. there are a handful of incredibly professional short sellers, hats off, able to turn pessimism into profits but i don't recommend trying to follow in their footsteps at home. i never recommend s
that this country could become like greece. do you see that as a possibility? >> no, i do not see that as a -- i do not see us becoming a light breeze. it is a profoundly different situation. i do see the possibility that we could have the debt that could truly be harmful. the congressional budget office, which is nonpartisan, says if we stay on the course we are on, we'll have a debt that is 230% of our gdp over the next 20 years. most of the experts say that once you get a debt over 90% of your gross domestic product, that inhibit future economic growth. and in a pretty significant way. this is not just about numbers. it is about opportunities for people. whether you'll be able to send your kid to school, send them to college, whether they will be able to buy a car, buy a house. are you going to be able to start a business and have it succeed? whether or not you have economic opportunity for the people of the country. and we know with the best academic research that has been done that if a country's debt gets too large in relationship to the size of its economy, the economy does not grow as fast.
prediction for 2012 correct. >> rubbing it in. >> greece will stain the euro in 2013. that's what lang merkel wants and she's holding the purse strings. she wants to be re-elected and doesn't want any cost of contagion in. the cost on a relative basis is cheap. mexico is the next hot market. almost unnoticed, our southern neighbor becoming an economic stronghold on its own. legal and financial reforms have led to a growing middle class. as china gets more expensive, mexico becomes more competitive in manufacturing. africa disappoints classic emerging markets of russia, brazil and china slow down from their heyday and so-called frontier funds have been started with a focus on the next hot growth area, focusing on africa and many believe now is the time. this is an overgeneralization. the rule of law is not widespread enough in the continent. there is a glimmer of hope such as sun nish sha. countries such as egypt still questionable. we have seen mass rioting there and growing concerns whether the new rule of law and new constitution will effectively protect investors. >> just a few years ago,
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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